Sources and references

  1. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). (2007). Toxicological profile for Lead. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. Available at:
    https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp13.pdf
  2. Health and Safety Executive. (2012). Lead and You INDG305 (rev2). Available at:
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg305.pdf
  3. Health and Safety Executive. (2019). Working safely with lead. Available at:
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/lead/
  4. Lewis, R. J. (2007). Hawley’s Condensed Chemical Dictionary (Fifteenth Edition). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
  5. Public Health England. (2016). Lead – General Information. Available at:
    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/562435/lead_general_information.pdf
  6. Selwyn L. (2010). Lead in Museum Collections and Heritage Buildings – Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) Notes 1/8. Canadian Conservation Institute / Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada. Available at:
    https://www.canada.ca/en/conservation-institute/services/conservation-preservation-publications/canadian-conservation-institute-notes/lead-museum-collections.html
  7. Sohn E. (2019). Lead: Versatile Metal, Long Legacy. Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program. Available at:
    https://sites.dartmouth.edu/toxmetal/more-metals/lead-versatile-metal-long-legacy/
  8. Sohn E. (2019). The facts on lead. Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program. Available at:
    https://sites.dartmouth.edu/toxmetal/more-metals/lead-versatile-metal-long-legacy/the-facts-on-lead/